Upcoming events

How do you practice self-care ? How do you connect with yourself, with your emotions and needs ?

In our everyday life, we can tend to disconnect from ourselves, to be very busy or anxious, to struggle with our mental health, or just to have difficulties taking time for ourselves.

As sexworkers, it can be reinforced by having draining or difficult clients, not knowing how much we will earn every month, or dealing with the stigma society places upon us.

 

This workshop will be a time to exchange our self-care methods, then to do together different self-care exercises : short meditation to connect with our bodies and emotions, writing exercise to have an overview of what's up in our life, self-massaging, co-listening, and write/draw about our relationship to Sexwork.

 

The workshop is open to sexworkers and former sexworkers (escort, domina, stripper, webcam model, full service sexworker in a brothel or in the street, sugarbaby, and so on).

 

I invite you to bring a notebook and a pen, some material if you want to draw, and a cushion or yoga mat if you want to sit on the floor.
This is a free workshop, in English, and it will take place at the Hydra Cafe.
Due to Corona regulations, we have limited space. To reserve a spot
please send an email to:
emilianwalter.contact@gmail.com

Past events

As sexworkers, we have to clarify our boundaries with our customers, to say what we agree to do or not. This is not always easy. The boundaries are not only about sexual practises, but also about our conditions to meet someone, the respect of our private life, and more.

Consent is also identifying the pressures that can reduce our capacity to say no.

In this workshop, we will define consent together, think about the pressures we experience in Sexwork, and learn how to negociate better with our customers.

It is also a time to reflect deeper on our consent practice in general. A time to listen to ourselves, to see how important are both our desires and boundaries.

 

The workshop is open to sexworkers and former sexworkers (escort, domina, stripper, webcam model, full service sexworker in a brothel or in the street, sugarbaby, and so on).

 

This is a free workshop, in English, and it will take place at the Hydra Cafe.

What is being consensual with ourselves ? It is recognizing our needs, desires and boundaries. It is learning learning how to meet our needs, follow our desires, and respect our own boundaries. And when it is in a social situation, how to express all of that to others, asking for what we want and stating what we don't.

In this talk, I will share with you my own experience and what I discovered about an every day consent practice with ourselves. I'll talk about why it is so hard to recognize our own needs, desires and boundaries, and how to do so. And I'll give you some tips on how to communicate them to others, and some exercises that could help you begin or continue your consent practice.

The event will last one hour top, including a time for you to ask questions after the talk.
If you're as nerdy as me, your pen and notebook are welcome.

The event is donation based, via paypal or bank transfer.

Link to the Jitsi Room the day of the event on the bio of my instagram or in the facebook event :

https://www.facebook.com/events/720538452053500/

This workshop offers you a time to think about your relationship to your gender. We will begin by raising some questions, then drawing, painting or writing about our gender identity.

 

Gender is an important part of our identity. It plays in our behaviors, ways to see the world, and in how others interact with us. Gender non conforming people such as me have to face what their gender means for them. For cisgender people, thinking deeply about their gender allows them to know themselves better.

 

This workshop is open to gender non-conforming people and cisgender people who are in a trans allyship process.

For cisgender people participating, it is very important that you respect everybody's pronouns, and I will ask you to avoid all generalities about characteristics that would be inherently for men or for women.

This space is not for debating, it is for each participant to connect with their own